Check out PaveAI for Analytics

I’m a bit of a stats junkie, but what I love more than a giant pile of charts and tables are tools that can actually help me understand my stats at a high level. I’ve reviewed such services in the past and have also blogged about my own experiments building dashboards and other views on top of Google Analytics. Earlier this month I was contacted by the folks at PaveAI.

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Using IBM Watson Tone Analyzer in OpenWhisk

Earlier today I decided to write up a quick wrapper to the IBM Watson Tone Analyzer using OpenWhisk. It ended up being so incredibly trivial I doubted it made sense to even blog about it, but then I realized - this is part of what makes OpenWhisk, and serverless, so incredible. I was able to deploy a function that acts as a proxy to the REST APIs Tone Analyzer uses. All this action does is literally expose the Watson Developer npm package interface to an OpenWhisk user.

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Some Thoughts on Static Sites and Security

I’ve been chewing on this blog post for a little while now and while I’m waiting for a keynote to start I thought I’d spend some time to write it up. Let me preface this blog entry by making it very clear: I am not a security expert. I think I have a good handle on security issues at the level every developer should, but it is not my primary role, so take the following with a grain of salt.

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Creating Alexa Skills with OpenWhisk - Part Two

This is my followup to last week’s post on building Alexa skills with OpenWhisk. What I’m describing today represents some very recent changes and I would warn people that this post may change in the future. The focus of this post involves what you need to do to get your Alexa skill verified. I’m still in the process of doing that myself, but my holdup now isn’t related to technical issues so I feel safe in sharing this update.

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A Twitter Package for OpenWhisk

I’ve been chewing on an idea for something I’d like to build with OpenWhisk and Alexa, and part of it involves Twitter integration. Since working with serverless means working with small, atomic functions, I decided to focus on the Twitter aspect first. I also thought it would be cool to start work on a Twitter package that could be used by other OpenWhisk users. I launched that package today, and while it is pretty small for now, I hope to expand on it over time.

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Quick console script for O'Reilly Authors

So… let me start off by saying that this blog post will be useful to approximately 0.01% of you. I’m really just blogging this so I can copy and paste the code later when I want it again. But I thought it also might be a useful reminder for folks that your browser console is useful for many things, including for ‘fixing’ issues you may have with a particular page.

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An Introduction to Creating Alexa Skills with OpenWhisk

As I mentioned in my post earlier this week (A Tip for Testing Alexa Skills), I’m a huge new fan of the Amazon Echo device and I’ve begun looking at how to build my own integrations with it. This week I’ve done some investigations into how to use Alexa with OpenWhisk and I have to say I’m impressed by how easy it is. To be clear, I’ve only played with the most basic of skills, but it is easy and quite a bit of fun too!

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New Option for Android Testing - Genymotion on Demand

I’ve been talking about Genymotion (technically Genymotion Desktop) for a while now as a speedier alternative to the horribly slow native Android simulator. While Android’s default simulator has gotten a lot better lately, I still think Genymotion Desktop is worth your time checking out if you are doing any work at all with Android. The folks behind this cool tool have just recently released another new service, Genymotion on Demand. Basically, this is an EC2-based virtualized Android device you can run from your browser.

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A tip for testing Alexa Skills

A week or so ago I got my first Echo device (a Dot as a speaker gift from Devnexus) and I fell in love with it so much that I’ve already purchased the larger model. My wife ands kids like it too. So naturally I decided to take a look at building custom skills for it. (For folks who don’t know, a “Skill” is basically a program that lets the device respond to voice commands.

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