Twitter: raymondcamden


Address: Lafayette, LA, USA

Reprint: What in the heck is JSONP and why would you use it?

03-12-2014 2,837 views jQuery, JavaScript 6 Comments
Earlier this week I blogged about the demise of DevelopRIA. Last night someone pinged me about one of my articles there so I thought it would be a good idea to republish it. The article is somewhat old (4 years or so) and doesn't mention CORS at all, but hopefully it is still useful to folks. But please keep the age in mind when reading. (My god - I actually preferred XML. What was I thinking?!?!)

Have you ever looked at some technology, or framework, and simply didn't understand why someone would use it? For some time now I've never quite gotten what JSONP is, nor why someone would use it over XML. Everything finally cleared up for me last week and since I assume (I hope!) I'm not alone in being confused, I thought I'd share what I learned.

Using the autodivider feature in jQuery Mobile

12-17-2013 4,480 views Mobile, jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 2 Comments

A few days ago a reader asked me an interesting question. He wanted to create a list of dates in jQuery Mobile and group them by date. Turns out, this is fairly easy using the Autodividers feature of the ListView widget.

jQuery UI Video Course

12-13-2013 2,771 views Development, jQuery, JavaScript Comments

Just a quick note to let y'all know about a new video course available for jQuery UI. Ben Fhala released a set of videos for Packt covering jQuery UI. I had the pleasure of doing a tech review on the videos a few months back and I thought they were pretty well done. I haven't really talked much about jQuery UI lately but I've got a lot of respect for it. You can find more details about the video product here and watch a sample below.

Building a Quiz Manager for jQuery Mobile

12-05-2013 6,691 views Mobile, jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 32 Comments

A few weeks ago a reader asked if I had ever designed a quiz for jQuery Mobile. While I had not, I spent some time thinking about how a quiz could be designed as well as how a generic library could help automate it. I've built a demo I'd like to share with folks. It is definitely "First Draft" (but hey, it lints!) so feel free to tear it apart and suggest improvements.

Building a Contact Form with Parse and Mailgun

11-12-2013 6,235 views jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 5 Comments

I'm currently working on an article that discusses various third party services that can help flesh out a static web site. While researching that article, I got to thinking about contact forms and how (or if) I could use Parse to power them. Parse is built for ad hoc data storage of - well - anything. I wouldn't typically think of contact forms as being something I'd want to save, but the more I thought about it, the more I thought that in some organizations this could be a powerful feature. You can track communication over time as well as use the email addresses as a list to contact in the future. There are probably multiple ways of doing this, but here is what I came up with.

Snap.svg demo - Census Data

10-28-2013 6,890 views Development, jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 1 Comment

Last week I blogged about the release of Snap.svg, a new library for modern browsers to simplify the creation, usage, and animation of SVG assets. Over the past few days I've worked on a new demo of Snap.svg that I'd like to share with you.

Working with jQuery Mobile Panels

09-05-2013 5,292 views Mobile, jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 5 Comments

I'm currently working on an update to my jQuery Mobile book (jQuery Mobile Web Development Essentials), but for those curious about one of the cooler new features of jQuery Mobile, check out my new article on DZone (and yes, I am doing a lot more articles this year - all part of the master plan):

Working with jQuery Mobile Panels

Simple Reverse Geocoding Example

03-05-2013 15,958 views jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 50 Comments

Have you ever seen a web site that seemed to know where you were located? I'm not talking about a map, but the actual name of the location? This is done with a process called "Reverse Geocoding." Whereas geocoding refers to translating a human-readable address into a longitude/latitude pair, reverse geocoding is, well, the opposite of that. Given a longitude/latitude pair, what would be the description of that location. In this blog post I'll show a simple example of this process. My example application will attempt to report the city and state you live in.

Presentation: Browser Tools for Debugging

02-22-2013 4,317 views Mobile, Development, jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 5 Comments

A huge thank you goes to Andrew Trice for spending hours on polishing and editing a video of my last presentation. He uploaded it to Youtube and now you guys can watch it as well. I'm proud of this presentation so I hope it is helpful. As always, criticism is welcome. You can download the demos and slide deck here:

https://github.com/cfjedimaster/BrowserToolsForDebuggingAndProfit

Google Map/Directions Mashup

02-18-2013 5,330 views jQuery, JavaScript, HTML5 Comments

A while back I ran into an interesting problem with Google Maps. I was booking travel for a conference and needing to find the closest Marriott to the conference location. I didn't know the area very well so seeing a few addresses meant nothing to me. I figured Google Maps would be able to help me, but I could only plot one location at a time. (To be clear, I bet there is a way to plot multiple addresses, I just couldn't find it.) I then tried the Directions service. That too was only able to work with two addresses. I ended up entering 4 or 5 Marriott addresses and just trying to remember which one seemed shorter. To get around this, I built a simple application that lets you enter up to five starting addresses and a destination. It then plots driving directions and reports on the total distances for each. It also reports on which starting address is the best.